Frequently asked questions

Q. How do I find my results?

We encourage you to visit the event’s website for the link to your event’s results. The event website will provide you not only results but pertinent information.

The online results are searchable by bib number and/or full surname as recorded during registration.

Q. Do you wish to have your name withheld from results?

Participants are able to opt out of having their name and city displayed in the results and/or on the announcer data frequently used at an event to welcome entrants to the finish. In that case the participant's bib number will be shown with no name (literally "Name Withheld") or city identified. The time, gender place, and age group place would still be displayed on the web and searchable under bib number and/or the surname "Withheld". Participants are able to opt out by indicating they wish to do so at registration, or by contacting The Timing Team or the event's organisers at any stage during or after registration.

We would like to remind event participants that publically available information from a wide range of sources on the internet - not just events we time - can become available through online searching, and we encourage people not wishing to have their names published in race results to indicate that to the organiser or us when registering at or for an event.

Q. How do I fit my bib/timing kit?

Please see the tag fitting guide page and download one of our PDF fitting guides. 

Q. What is the difference between Gun time and Mat time?

When the official time is Gun time (rarely a gun, more often a count down to a hooter/"Go"), entrant times are calculated from when the first "gun" for an event distance was recorded to when the entrant's tag was recorded on the finish line. Placings are consequently calculated on Gun time.

Not everyone can (or does) start (cross the start line) on the gun. Knowing this some events choose to have results calculated on Mat time. Mat time is the elapsed time from the last time a tag is recorded crossing a designated start line, until the first time the same tag is recorded crossing a designated finish line. 

So which is more accurate: mat or gun time. The truth, when producing results for events, is a somewhat grey area.

For events where merit prizes are based on the order one reaches the finish, the times for those placings are derived from the gun times, that is the elapsed time between when the "Gun" started the event and when an entrant reaches the finish line. The "truth" of these placings can be verified by the cameras at the finish, and to a lesser extent by the more variable memories of those involved. So one truth is that everyone finishes in a ranking determined by the order they cross the finish line. When merit prizes are awarded by gun times, then gun times are given priority. Are these times misleading?

Well another truth is everyone crosses the start line at a different time so has a unique mat to mat time, and this time for everyone but a few in the starting row will be significantly faster than the gun time. If mat times are given priority, are these times misleading? Not in terms of reflecting the entrant's actual net time, but the results produced from them in terms of rankings/finish order do not reflect the finish order seen by spectators or recorded on camera.

When we display times we also display places, and these placings must reflect the type of time, i.e. if we show gun times as the official time we must show results calculated by gun time, and when we show mat times as the official time, rankings must be calculated on mat time. If not there would be serious grounds to challenge the maths!

The elephant in the room is that everyone wants (and generally deserves) to have their best time shown. This is why your certificate may for some events display only your mat time.

The problem for us if we were to display only mat times when gun times are the basis for awarding prizes occurs arises when a vociferous minority of entrants in any event choose to pursue a claim to a prize/reward on grounds that their mat time would gain them a place when the event rules state awards are determined by gun time.

Q. What is the difference between passive tags and active tags?

ChronoTrack UHF RFID tags are thin strips that are attached to the back of the competitor’s bib, on a baton, on a Bike seatpost kit, or on an MTB numberplate. These Ultra High Radio Frequency tags are weather resistant and lightweight for an enhanced competitor experience. These passive timing technology tags are activated by passing through a field created by high-functioning RFID antennas. The antennas pass information to the controllers where it is processed on to be scored. ChronoTrack UHF RFID race timing tags are recycleable and landfill safe, reducing secondary impact by scaling back the resources needed for distribution and collection. ChronoTrack UHF RFID race timing tags are single-use.

Each ChronoTrack active tag has a battery embedded in the transponder, making it powerful enough to send timing data to the loop wire and transceiver through mud or water. Active tags are accurate to .1 second, regardless of natural interferences, meaning reliable, accurate results for your athletes. ChronoTrack active tags are designed to be reused. They must be returned after use or a replacement charge will apply.

Q. Results Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy Intent

The Timing Team's privacy policy is intended to respect and maintain the privacy of our customers and all participants in the events we time.

Event Registration

The Timing Team has access to information collected on entrants' registration forms (electronic and/or paper). We treat this information as confidential and do not disclose it to any third parties or use it for any purpose other than to determine specific races each entrant has registered for, and which categories within those races an entrant qualifies for.

Event Results

The Timing Team provides event organisers with timing results to be posted at the event and used to award prizes on the day. We do this by electronic timing linked to tags supplied to participants which are in turn linked to the data acquired from each participant's registration form. We provide event organisers with name, city, race entered, age group and gender details, and specific categories a participant may be registered for. These details rely solely on information provided by participants to a given event on that event's registration forms either electronic or paper.

Website Results

The Timing Team displays event results on a custom developed website linked to each event's parent website. This is to enable participants and their friends to view their results both on the day and after the event. Results may be searched by entering the bib number worn on the day, or by entering your full surname as per your recorded registration details.

We do not use cookies on the results site, nor do we record or retain any personal information on visitors to the site. We collect standard industry statistics for the site as a whole, such as total visits per time period.

Participant's details displayed on the results website are: participant's bib no, participant's name, city, race entered, gender, age group, time.

Do you wish to have your name withheld from results?

Participants are able to opt out of having their name and city displayed in the results and/or on the announcer data frequently used at an event to welcome entrants to the finish. In that case the participant's bib number will be shown with no name (literally "Name Withheld") or city identified. The time, gender place, and age group place would still be displayed on the web and searchable under bib number and/or the surname "Withheld". Participants are able to opt out by indicating they wish to do so at registration, or by contacting The Timing Team or the event's organisers at any stage during or after registration.

We would like to remind event participants that publically available information from a wide range of sources on the internet - not just events we time - can become available through online searching, and we encourage people not wishing to have their names published in race results to indicate that to the organiser or us when registering at or for an event.